Case Posture

Bond Reduction Attorney

With 17 years of criminal defense practice the Louisville Criminal Defense Attorney has handled State Crime Defense, Federal Crime Defense, Misdemeanor Crime Defense, Felony Crime Defense, Bond Reduction, Arraignment, Pretrial Conference, Reduction in Bond, Post Grand Jury Bond, Bond Forfeiture, Jury Trial and more.  

Louisville Criminal Defense Attorney

When arrested in Louisville for any crime, but especially Gun Crime or Domestic Violence Crime, you need our Bond Reduction Attorney in Louisville.  It may not be heard in its entirety at arraignment, but a motion for bond reduction can be made for the closest pretrial conference.  

Often "hogged" by appellate courts in regards to its definition, it is meaning where you are in the case against you?
Pre-charge, pre-arrest, or arrested and booked.  You always need a bond reduction attorney to help.  
Every jurisdiction has different terms and different descriptions of their trial court. Kentucky has District Court for misdemeanor trials, or cases that carry up to 365 days in jail.

Kentucky has Circuit Court for Felony Crime Trials, or cases that carry more than 1 year and up to life without the possibility of parole, and death. Kentucky has District Court for Misdemeanor Crime Trials, or cases that carry no more than 365 days with original jurisdiction.  

New York's trial court is called the Supreme Court and others have superior courts. 

No matter the name or description of a trial court in the United States there are well defined divisions which helps people understand where you are in "the process." I often ask people where they are in "the grinder," "the spin," "the beater," "their hell."  

Circuit Court versus District Court within Kentucky.  (or)
Felony versus Misdemeanor Court

After 17 years I know the process is worrisome and hard to understand. It is a constant reminder when people call me to hire me for their case. They often cannot tell me where their case is procedurally. Chronologically it is hard too, because many people do not distinguish between District and Circuit Court.  
1. District Court, or misdemeanor charges, are handled county to county. Example is Jefferson District Court handles misdemeanor charges in Louisville. Circuit Court is handled by the Commonwealth Attorney's Office, or representative of the state.  
2. Circuit Court, or felony charges, are charges brought by the state. The slang, "the case was dismissed, but I am scared the Commonwealth will pick it up."  
People are very confused, no matter the age. They often tell me they are worried the commonwealth is going to pick up their case, but it is a misdemeanor. I have to explain that the Commonwealth does not have jurisdiction for misdemeanor, only felony.  
Here are places acknowledgeable in all jurisdictions:
1. Pre-arrest/arrest/search warrant.
2. Arraignment.
3. Bond Reduction.
4. Pretrial Conferences.
5. Jury Trial.  

Procedural Posture of the Case

Often "hogged" by appellate courts in regards to its definition, it is meaning where you are in the case against you?
Pre-charge, pre-arrest, or arrested and booked. 
Every jurisdiction has different terms and different descriptions of their trial court. Kentucky has District Court for misdemeanor trials, or cases that carry up to 365 days in jail.

Kentucky has Circuit Court for Felony Trials, or cases that carry more than 1 year and up to life without the possibility of parole, and death. Kentucky has District Court for Misdemeanor Trials, or cases that carry no more than 365 days with original jurisdiction.  

New York's trial court is called the Supreme Court and others have superior courts. 

No matter the name or description of a trial court in the United States there are well defined divisions which helps people understand where you are in "the process." I often ask people where they are in "the grinder," "the spin," "the beater," "their hell."  

State Court versus Federal Court

The state and federal courts are very similar in regards to case flow, or the procedural due process. The United States makes much more of an effort to keep the defendant alert to the "procedural posture" of the case, but much more secretive regarding the discovery in the case. In short, the U.S. likes to keep the Defendant from learning more about his case. 1) Arraignment; 2) Bond Reduction; 3) Pretrial Conferences; Motions, etc. 4) Trial Date.  
1. Arraignment: The Initial Appearance predicates the arraignment if they were apprehended before a grand indictment.) Unlike state, a motion triggering the Speedy Trial Act is entered at arraignment the courts will pick a date before the 70 day Speedy Trial Act tolls. 
2. Bond Reduction: In both state and federal court, hearings like bond reduction happen at the pretrial motions nearest in time and place. Place for federal because there are multiple courthouses in the state.  
3. Pretrial conference: Motions, etc.
4. Trial date: Normally pretrial conferences taking up any issues not resolved or anything new that as come up.  
Share by: